How to Clear and Cleanse Your Tarot Deck

Have you ever wondered whether you should clear and cleanse your Tarot deck? Imagine you’ve just bought a new Tarot deck, or you’ve had a particularly challenging reading. It’s not a bad idea to clear and cleanse your Tarot deck and charge your Tarot cards with loads of good, pure energy!

Tarot is all about energy, so if you want to get the best results from your Tarot readings, it’s essential that you’re working with crystal clear energy. That all starts by cleansing your Tarot deck and infusing it with all your good vibes!

So, let’s talk about when to cleanse your deck and how to do it.

WHEN TO CLEANSE A TAROT DECK

You’ll need to cleanse your Tarot deck the first time you buy it, especially if it’s a pre-owned deck.

Remember, decks carry energy so you want to make sure that your deck carries your energy, rather than someone else’s. So make sure you give it a good energy cleanse before you start using the cards.

After you’ve cleansed your new deck, you will probably find that you need to cleanse it again as you continue to read with it. There are no strict rules about when to clear and cleanse your deck – you’ve simply got to trust your intuition about what your deck needs. Sometimes a quick shuffle is enough to clear out any stuck energy. Other times, a full moon bath is called for.

Generally, you’ll know when you need to cleanse your Tarot cards – you will get that niggling feeling that something isn’t quite right with the connection between you and your cards.

Here are some examples of when you may want to cleanse your Tarot deck:

  • You or your Tarot cards have been exposed to a lot of negative energy (for example, a particularly negative client or a challenging situation in your own personal life).
  • Your Tarot readings are confusing and unclear, and you are often drawing a blank with the cards.
  • Other people have touched your cards without your permission.
  • Your cards have fallen on the floor or had some other sort of accident.
  • You haven’t used your Tarot cards for quite some time and you want to reconnect with your cards.
  • You’ve had a major personal transformation and want to refresh your deck with your new energy.
  • It’s a full moon and you want to make the most of its powerful energy.
  • It just feels like now is the right time for a cleanse.

HOW TO CLEANSE A TAROT DECK

There are lots of different ways to clear negative energy and cleanse your Tarot deck.

The important thing is to choose the technique(s) that feel right to you and to the situation (e.g. you might use one technique in between each reading and another technique to cleanse on an annual basis).

Here are some ideas for clearing and cleansing a Tarot deck:

Sorting and Shuffling

Firstly, sort your cards in order, starting with the Major Arcana, then into each of the suits of the Minor Arcana. While you’re doing this, look briefly at each card and remember the special message it has to offer you in your readings.

You can also use this time to check that you have every card in your deck (a few years back, I found that I had been missing the Ace of Swords for quite some time without even realizing it!).

Once your cards are sorted and in order, start shuffling and reinvigorating your cards with your energy. You might like to shuffle seven times, put your cards in a big messy pile and randomly select cards, or simply use a shuffling technique that is comfortable to you.

Knocking or Tapping the Deck

A quick way to release any stuck energy in between readings is to knock or tap the deck 3 times while also visualizing that stuck energy being released. It’s particularly helpful if you’ve had a reading that was quite intense or the energy afterward felt unresolved.

Meditation

Hold your cards in both hands, close your eyes and relax. Allow your mind to be free of any thought and just ‘be’ with your cards. You may then like to visualize the Universal energy being drawn through you and to your cards, surrounding your cards in a protective white light. Those with an understanding of Reiki may like to use this mode of energy healing to cleanse their cards by channeling their healing Reiki energy through the cards. This is personally my favorite as it is easy to do in between readings and it helps me focus and concentrate on my next client.

Moon Bath

The full moon is an excellent source of energy for your cards. On a full moon, you can simply place your cards in a window or even outside to bathe in the moonlight. Alternatively, many people use this time to conduct a special ritual or to cite different incantations for cleansing their Tarot cards.

Smudge Stick

Burn some dried sage or rosemary (or use a store-bought smudge stick) and simply pass the cards through the smoke several times. You can also cleanse any crystals that you use during the process.

Salt Burial

Salt can be used to draw out negative energy from your cards, just like you would use salt to draw out the moisture from a food item in cooking. First, wrap your Tarot in a plastic bag as tightly as you can. Then take an airtight container that is larger than your Tarot deck, place your wrapped cards inside, and completely surround your cards with salt on all sides, above and below. It is imperative that this is an airtight container as salt not only gathers the energies from a Tarot deck well, it also gathers any moisture that might be in the air, potentially damaging your cards. Keep your cards buried in the salt for at least a few days or a week before taking them out and disposing of the salt.

Fresh Air

Just after a rain shower or even in the warmth of the sun, place your cards outside to take in the fresh air and draw in the cleansing rays. Of course, keep in mind the practicalities. Be careful not to place them in a windy position or somewhere where you may end up doing more damage!

Elemental Clearing

Elemental clearing brings your awareness to using different techniques that are aligned with each of the four elements used in Tarot. For example,  use the Salt burial for Earth clearing; for Water clearing, use the Moon Bath or sprinkle a little water on your cards; with Fire clearing, pass your cards over a candle; Use a smudge stick for Air clearing. You may like to go through each of the four elements for a more comprehensive cleansing.

STORING YOUR TAROT CARDS

Now that you’ve cleansed your Tarot deck, here are a couple of ideas on how to store your cards:

  • Store your cards with a quartz crystal which is a wonderful absorber of energies. If you want to keep your crystal ‘clean’ too, then use any of the cleansing techniques above.
  • Place your Tarot cards at a specially made altar in between readings.
  • Use baby wipes to keep your cards clean and to remove any stickiness between cards.
  • Keep your Tarot cards wrapped in a special cloth or stored in a special Tarot box. Different colors have different energy so choose a color that infuses the energy you most want for your Tarot cards:
  • Black – shadows and the unknown
  • Blue – spirituality, and peace
  • Brown – earth and groundedness
  • Green – nature, and fertility
  • Pink – love, and beauty
  • Purple – higher knowledge
  • Red – energy, and vitality
  • White – purity
  • Yellow – joy and happiness

So there you have it! You have lots of different ways you can easily clear and cleanse your Tarot cards to create crystal clear Tarot readings!

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What Is Tarot Astrology?

Tarot astrology is the system through which a reading of the cards in a tarot deck help you through troubled times by offering a reflection on your past, present, and future. Tarot is closely associated with astrology as each card relates to a planet, element, or astrological sign.

Tarot cards are used for divination, often known as fortune telling. But, many psychologists have used them as well, feeling that the cards often make patients delve in to how they feel about themselves. This is done through the subconscious. For example, let’s say you know work is not going well, but you do not allow yourself to think about it. Getting a tarot card reading that shows you need to change occupations is not really telling your future so much as it is making you face what is really going on in your life.

A tarot card deck consists of 78 cards that fall into two distinctive parts. The first part is called the Major Arcana. This part of the deck has 22 cards, 21 suitless cards referred to as trumps and one card called The Fool. It is believed that these cards represent different stages of life that we go through. Many are recognizable such as the Magician (associated with the planet Mercury), the Lovers (associated with the astrological sign Gemini), and the Death card (associated with Scorpio).

The other 56 cards are in the Minor Arcana. Arcana is taken from the Latin word “akanum,” meaning secret. The Minor Arcana is divided into four suits, just like regular playing cards. The four suits are the Cups, the Wands, the Swords, and the Pentacles. Each of these cards represents a certain element of the Earth and is associated with certain astrological signs. The Cups represent water and are associated most closely with Cancer, Scorpio, and Pisces. The Cups stand for emotions, spirituality, and the unconsciousness. The Wands represent fire and are associated with Aries, Leo, and Sagittarius. The Wands stand for action, creativeness, and personal growth. The Swords represent air and are associated with Libra, Gemini, and Aquarius. The Swords stand for the mind, intelligence, and knowledge. The final suit, the Pentacles, represents earth itself and is associated with Taurus, Virgo, and Capricorn. The Pentacles stand for the physique, bodily experiences, and practicality. In addition to the four suits, there are also Court cards including the King, Queen, Prince, and Princess for each suit.

The Minor Arcana cards provide more details to the Major Arcana cards. The Major Arcana gives an individual direction and information about their personal life and emotional and mental state. The Minor Arcana cards offer additional guidance in areas such as relationships, activities, failures, and successes. The Major Arcana cards are seen as more spiritual while the Minor Arcana cards are seen as material.

Over the years, the interpretation of the cards has evolved. Modern decks of tarot cards are much more expressive that than an earlier version, due in part to the pictures being more closely associated with their meaning. Tarot readers prize their cards and often will not let others touch them as they are viewed as sacred tools of their trade. Many card sets are often viewed as works of art because of the detailed pictures on each one.

Finding a psychic for a tarot reading is easy. If you are looking to visit a psychic in person, check in your local Yellow Pages under Psychic. If you live in a remote area or are leery of visiting a psychic in person, you can also get tarot card readings online. If you use your favorite Internet search engine to search on “free tarot reading,” you will find many sites appear. If you are leery that free readings might not be as accurate as paid reading, you can also find online psychics who will charge to do a reading. Some psychics will base their charges on how many questions you wish to ask about the reading while some will just charge a flat fee for so many minutes.

Whether you get a tarot card reading online or in person, there are several things you should keep in mind. The tarot card reading should not scare you, but rather give you a better understanding of yourself. They will help you with not only what your future holds, but also what is presently going on in your life. You should leave the reading with a positive attitude and feel enlightened.

Tarot Heritage: 600 Year Old Tradition

If you feel a special connection to tarot, you share a 600-year tradition with tarot lovers worldwide. Tarot’s history takes us from medieval Italian castles to French secret societies; with side-trips to visit English magicians, California hippies, and contemporary digital artists. Let’s explore the highlights of our shared tarot heritage.

The story begins when playing cards migrated down the Silk Road from China to Arabia. In the 1370s, Arab sailors landing in Italian and Spanish ports introduced playing cards to Europe. Their decks had four suits (Cups, Coins, Swords, and Batons) numbered ace through ten, plus three court cards.

Within a decade, these Arabic card games spread throughout Europe. Then in the 1430s, someone in northern Italy added a fifth suit illustrated with popular images like an empress, a pope, and lovers. This expanded deck was used to play a game called Tarocchi in Italy, and Tarot in France.

The inexpensive paper cards ordinary people used have all disappeared. But decks made for Italian aristocrats using gold leaf, crushed lapis lazuli, and other precious materials are housed in museums throughout Europe and the United States. We can even hold a piece of tarot history in our hands, thanks to reprints of the Duke of Milan’s 1450 Visconti-Sforza deck.

Everything changed in 1500 when political and economic power shifted from Italy to France. French print shops dominated the playing card industry. Printers kept up with demand by inventing ways to print cards faster and cheaper. They simplified suit symbols to the easily stenciled hearts, diamonds, spades and clubs; while the older suit symbols (coins, cups, swords and batons) were only used in tarot decks. This older card style was standardized into the Tarot de Marseille pattern. The French still prefer this deck for readings.

In the mid-1700’s, a Parisian astrologer and fortune teller named Etteilla revolutionized tarot reading. Etteilla operated a school for tarot and astrology, published a tarot magazine, designed his own deck, and wrote books on how to read cards. His biggest innovation was teaching his students to lay out spreads and tell a story, and to use reversals.

During the 1700s, people gradually abandoned tarot for trendier games.While the game was fading in popularity, occultists were discovering tarot’s mystical properties.Esoteric lodges and secret societies spread throughout Europe teaching Qabalah, astrology, alchemy and ceremonial magic.When an unknown occultist made a connection between the 22 tarot trump cards and the 22 letters of the Hebrew alphabet, he reinvented tarot as the transmitter of secret cabalistic correspondences.

Students of the occult believed Tarot and Qabalah were essentially the same, and that both originated in ancient Egypt.Occultists like the influential French author Oswald Wirth designed Egyptian decks labelled with Hebrew letters to bring tarot closer to its supposed origins. Meanwhile, English occultists translated French magical treatises and dreamed of improving on them.

In the 1880s, two English occultists devised an alternate to the French system. They created correspondences between tarot cards and colors, musical notes, Hebrew letters, the Tree of Life, and astrology. A British secret society, The Hermetic Order of the Golden Dawn, used this system for its rituals and teachings. In the early twentieth century, Golden Dawn lodges in the United States imported this system, along with tarot, across the Atlantic.

In 1909, A. E. Waite, a Christian mystic and former member of the Golden Dawn, teamed up with the artist Pamela Colman Smith to create a revolutionary new deck. He added Christian and Egyptian details to the major arcana, like Adam and Eve as the Lovers, and sphinxes pulling the Chariot. Smith, who was a set designer, drew a scene on each minor arcana card. The resulting Rider Waite deck (now called Waite Smith) sent tarot down an exciting new path.

Eden Gray’s tarot books for beginners, published in the 1960s and still in print, were illustrated with the Waite Smith deck and used Waite’s card meanings. These immensely popular books created a huge demand for Waite’s deck, and sparked an industry of Waite Smith spin-offs inspired by anything from goddesses to gummy bears. Gray taught an accessible, story-telling method of card reading that took tarot out of esoteric lodges and into the mainstream.

By 1970, Waite’s deck, his card interpretations, the Celtic Cross spread, and Golden Dawn symbolism appeared in nearly every English-language tarot book. This created a unique Anglo-American tarot style that’s very different from European practices based on the Tarot de Marseille.

In the late 1960s, the counter culture’s “anything goes” spirit transformed a segment of the tarot scene.Tarot readers threw away their books to read in a loose, free-association style. Deck artists transcended the Waite Smith model and poured their visions into the 78-card framework.Tarot fragmented into hundreds of decks appealing to a diverse range of interests. The 1969 Xultun Tarot was the first of many decks rooted in a wide range of subcultures and world mythologies.

The internet has given a huge boost to creativity and individualism. Self-publishing and print-on-demand frees authors and deck creators from domination by conservative, profit-driven publishing houses. A supportive global community provides instant encouragement and feedback.

Tarot has experienced many changes in 600 years, yet the deck has remained essentially the same. Over 500 years ago, an Italian priest made a list of tarot cards in the margin of a sermon. The names and the order of his cards are identical to today’s tarot. When you hold a tarot deck in your hands, you’re holding centuries of tradition and history.

Do you own a reprint of a historic deck? Have you tried reading with it? We’d love to hear about your connection to tarot history.

How Water, Fire, Earth and Air Shape the Tarot

One of the fastest ways to learn to read Tarot is to understand the elements (water, fire, earth, and air) that sit behind the Tarot Suits of the Minor Arcana.

These elements are what truly shape the Minor Arcana and give a specific type of energy to each Suit.

Combine it with numerology (from 1 to 10), and you’ve already unlocked the meanings behind 40 of the 78 Tarot cards. Now that’s an efficient way to learn Tarot!

In this post, I’ll walk you through the elements and how you can create a personal connection with each of them. I’ll also show you what these elements reveal about the four Tarot suits, and how to use them easily and effortlessly in your Tarot readings.

THE FOUR ELEMENTS

There are four classical elements – water, fire, earth, and air – each with its own ‘energy’ and symbolic meaning.

And in the Tarot, each of the Suits is related to one of these four elements.

THE WATER ELEMENT (SUIT OF CUPS)

Water is fluid, agile and ‘in flow’ but it’s also very powerful and formative. It can be soft and gentle, like waves lapping against the sandy shore, or it can be powerful and even forceful, like a raging river.

The element of water is symbolic of fluidity, feelings and emotions, intuition, relationships, healing, and cleansing. It is a feminine element and reflects the subtle power that often resides within women. It is receptive, adaptable, purifying and flowing.

In the Tarot, water relates to the Suit of Cups. The Suit of Cups Tarot card meanings deal with the emotional level of consciousness and are associated with love, feelings, relationships, and connections. The Cups Tarot cards indicate that you are thinking with your heart rather than your head, and thus reflect your spontaneous responses and your habitual reactions to situations. Cups are also linked to creativity, romanticism, fantasy, and imagination.

The negative aspects of the Suit of Cups include being overly emotional or completely disengaged and dispassionate, having unrealistic expectations and fantasizing about what could be. There may be repressed emotions, an inability to truly express oneself and a lack of creativity.

THE FIRE ELEMENT (SUIT OF WANDS)

Fire is hot, wild, unpredictable, and energetic. It can be creative in helping us to cook food or build tools, or it can be destructive, like a devastating bush fire or house fire.

The element of fire is symbolic of passion, energy, enthusiasm, and sexuality. It is a masculine element and reflects the drive and willpower of the masculine energy.

In the Tarot, the fire element is represented by the Suit of Wands. The Suit of Wands Tarot card meanings is associated with primal energy, spirituality, inspiration, determination, strength, intuition, creativity, ambition and expansion, original thought and the seeds through which life springs forth.

Wands cards deal with the spiritual level of consciousness and mirror what is important to you at the core of your being. They address what makes us tick – our personalities, egos, enthusiasts, self-concepts, and personal energy, both internal and external.

The negative aspects of the Suit of Wands include illusion, egotistical behavior, impulsiveness, a lack of direction or purpose, or feeling meaningless.

THE EARTH ELEMENT (SUIT OF PENTACLES)

Earth is tactile, earthy and tangible. It creates the foundation from which the planet can grow and develop, and it supports and nurtures the plants and trees.

Earth is grounded, stable, supportive and fertile. It is a feminine element that is receptive – it takes in nutrients and sun rays and then uses this energy to sustain the life that grows out of it.

In the Tarot, the earth element is represented by the Suit of Pentacles. The Suit of Pentacles Tarot card meanings covers material aspects of life including work, business, trade, property, money and other material possessions. The positive aspects of the Suit of Pentacles include a manifestation, realization, proof, and prosperity.

Pentacles deal with the physical or external level of consciousness and thus mirror the outer situations of your health, finances, work, and creativity. They have to do with what we make of our outer surroundings – how we create it, shape it, transform it and grow it. On a more esoteric level, Pentacles are associated with the ego, self-esteem, and self-image.

The negative aspects of the Suit of Pentacles include being possessive, greedy and overly materialistic, over-indulging and not exercising, not effectively managing one’s finances, and being overly focused on career to the detriment of other life priorities. Often what is required to counteract these negative aspects is a return to nature to ground oneself and rediscover what is truly important.

THE AIR ELEMENT (SUIT OF SWORDS)

Air is intangible and unseen, but also in constant movement. Air can be still and mostly unnoticed, to becoming a breeze or a fierce wind. It is powerful yet refreshing and cleansing.

Symbolically, the air element relates to knowledge, action, power, and change. It is a masculine energy that can lead by force and power, even though it remains unseen.

In the Tarot, the Suit of Swords is related to air. The Suit of Swords Tarot card meanings is associated with action, change, force, power, oppression, ambition, courage, and conflict. Action can be constructive and/or destructive.

The Suit of Swords deals with the mental level of consciousness that is centered around the mind and the intellect. Swords mirror the quality of mind present in your thoughts, attitudes, and beliefs. Swords themselves are double-edged and in this way, the Suit of Swords symbolizes the fine balance between intellect and power and how these two elements can be used for good or evil. As such, the Swords must be balanced by the spirit (Wands) and feeling (Cups).

The negative aspects of the Suit of Swords include anger, guilt, harsh judgment, a lack of compassion and verbal and mental abuse.

CREATING A PERSONAL CONNECTION WITH THE ELEMENTS

One of the most powerful ways to connect with the elements and understand their true energy is to experience them.

For example, experience the element of water by spending time at the beach or a nearby river. Watch the rain fall and the puddles form. Turn on the tap at home and feel the water run over your hands. Take a swim in the ocean.

Simply observe the element in its purest form and watch how the element expresses itself in different ways.

Then, come back to your Tarot cards and look at how the element expresses itself in the cards. Pull out all of the Cups cards, for example, and take note of the water on each card. What do you notice now? Is the water flowing or stagnate? Is the water forceful or gentle? See what new insights are revealed to you with this deepened understanding.

Mastering the elements is a critical part of learning to read the Tarot. Once you connect deeply to the elements, you’ll have a heightened awareness of how the Tarot suits work and your Tarot readings will be even more in depth and insightful.

Choose an element to work with this week. Learn more about it and experience it in your everyday life. Then, look at how the element is expressed in the Tarot cards. What new insights do you have?

Tarot Card Meanings ( Quick Reference Guide)

If you are just learning the Tarot, print off this list of tarot card meanings to keep as a handy reference – it can be easier to look up meanings on a sheet of paper rather than flipping through the little white booklet that comes with most Tarot decks.

The Tarot deck is made up of 78 Tarot cards, each with its own unique Tarot card meaning. There are 22 Major Arcana cards and 56 Minor Arcana cards across four suits (Cups, Pentacles, Swords, and Wands). The Major Arcana consists of 22 cards that reflect key archetypes or spiritual lessons in our lives.

rider-waite-major-arcana

MAJOR ARCANA

The 22 cards of the major arcana are the heart of the deck. Each of these cards symbolizes some universal aspect of human experience. They represent the archetypes – consistent, directing patterns of influence that are an inherent part of human nature.

Each card in the major arcana has a name and number. Some names convey a card’s meaning directly, such as Strength, Justice, and Temperance. Other cards are individuals who personify a particular approach to life, such as the Magician or the Hermit. There are also cards with astronomical names, such as the Star, Sun, and Moon. They represent the elusive forces associated with these heavenly bodies.

0 The Fool – New beginnings, optimism, trust in life; Reversed: Delays

1 The Magician – Action, the power to manifest; Reversed: Misunderstandings.

2 The High Priestess – Inaction, going within, the subconscious; Reversed: Manipulations.

3 The Empress – Abundance, nurturing, fertility, life in bloom; Reversed: Neglect

4 The Emperor – Structure, stability, rules, and power; Reversed: Chaos

5 The Hierophant – Institutions, tradition, society and its rules; Reversed: Hypocrisy

6 The Lovers – Sexuality, passion, choice, uniting; Reversed: Separation

7 The Chariot – Movement, progress, integration; Reversed: Defeat

8 Strength – Courage, subtle power, integration of animal self; Reversed: Fear

9 The Hermit – Meditation, solitude, consciousness; Reversed: Isolation

10 Wheel of Fortune – Cycles, change, ups, and downs; Reversed: Stagnation

11 Justice – Fairness, equality, balance; Reversed: Lies

12 The Hanged Man – Surrender, a new perspective, enlightenment; Reversed: Stubbornness.

13 Death – The end of something, change, the impermeability of all things; Reversed: Limbo

14 Temperance – Balance, moderation, being sensible; Reversed: Impatience

15 The Devil – Destructive patterns, addiction, giving away your power; Reversed: Freedom

16 The Tower – Collapse of stable structures, release, sudden insight; Reversed: Control

17 The Star – Hope, calm, a good omen; Reversed: Darkness

18 The Moon – Mystery, the subconscious, dreams; Reversed: Paranoia

19 The Sun – Success, happiness, all will be well; Reversed: Failure

20 Judgment – Rebirth, a new phase, inner calling; Reversed: Regrets

21 The World – Completion, wholeness, attainment, celebration of life; Reversed: Incomplete

minor-arcana

MINOR ARCANA

There are 56 cards in the minor arcana divided into four suits: Wands, Cups, Swords, and Pentacles. Each of these suits stands for a particular approach to life:

  1. Swords
    The Swords are the suit of intellect, thought and reason. They are concerned with justice, truth, and ethical principles. Swords are associated with the element Air. A cloudless sky, open and light-filled, is a symbol of the mental clarity that is the Swords ideal. This suit is also associated with states that lead to disharmony and unhappiness. Our intellect is a valuable asset, but as an agent of ego, it can lead us astray if it is not infused with the wisdom of our Inner Guide.
  2. Cups
    The Cups are the suit of emotions and spiritual experience. They describe inner states, feelings and relationship patterns. The energy of this suit flows inward. Cups correspond to the yin, or feminine principle, in Chinese philosophy and are associated with the element Water. The ability of water to flow and fill up spaces, to sustain and to reflect changing moods makes it the ideal symbol of the Cups suit.
  3. Wands
    The Wands are the suit of creativity, action, and movement. They are associated with such qualities as enthusiasm, adventure, risk-taking, and confidence. This suit corresponds to the yang, or masculine principle, in Chinese philosophy and is associated with the element Fire. A flickering flame is the perfect symbol of the Wands force. This energy flows outward and generates passionate involvement.
  4. Pentacles
    The Pentacles are the suit of practicality, security and material concerns. They are associated with the element Earth and the concrete requirements of working with matter. In Pentacles, we celebrate the beauty of nature, our interactions with plants and animals and our physical experiences in the body. Pentacles also represent prosperity and wealth of all kinds. Sometimes this suit is called the Coins, an obvious symbol of the exchange of goods and services in the physical world.

SUIT OF SWORDS

suit-of-swords-tarot-cards
  • Other Names: Staves, arrows, spades
  • Element: Air
  • Attributes: Active, male
  • Astrological Signs: Gemini, Libra, Aquarius
  • Direction: West
  • Season: Pagan – Spring / Esoteric – Autumn
  • Self: Mind, thoughts, intellect
  • Jungian Function: Thinking
  • Body Part: Head
  • Qabalistic World: Yetzirah – the Formative World

Air is seen as the intellect, logic, and reasoning. An active element, Air circulates and so cleanses; it carries your thoughts and dreams; is also expansive when hot and is said to be expressive. Your mind or thoughts can be seen as clear or clouded; speech requires breath, which requires air.

Swords represent logic, the mind, and your thoughts. They deal with problems and troubles, planning, communication, ideas, your intellect and how you use it. They represent your daily and life struggles, problems in general. The very nature of a sword is aggressive and warlike. Combined with the swiftness of air, the combination can see situations arise quickly. The ability to see clearly means the resolution is quick also. Swords people are great thinkers. You will find them in the study, research, academia, the sciences, law courts, and libraries. They love to learn and live to do it in any capacity.

Keywords: decisions, worries, problems, issues, tension, communication, intelligence, disagreements; arguments, logic, reason, cognition, ideas, inspirations, balance, equilibrium, the mind, mentalism, thinking, facts and figures, definition.
Reversed: vicious, ruthless, manipulative, cold, unemotional, spite and malice, accidents, inertia, indecision, confusion, mental blockages, biased, illogical, mental health issues, negative life changes.

  • King – Serious, controlling, rational and mind/intellect-focused; Reversed: Foolish
  • Queen – Intelligent, writer, communicative yet cold; Reversed: Ineffective
  • Knight – Fierce, determined, aggressively pursues goals; Reversed: Boredom
  • Page – mentally unstable or intellectually immature, acts without thinking; Reversed: Stupidity
  • Ace of Swords – A fresh start, a sudden opportunity or idea, clarity; Reversed: Improbable
  • 2 – Indecision; Reversed: Conflicts
  • 3– Heartbreak, betrayal; Reversed: Torment
  • 4 – Meditation, rest, retreat; Reversed: Disturbance
  • 5 – Mind games, hostility; Reversed: Treachery
  • 6 – Leaving, accepting help, going somewhere better; Reversed: Trouble
  • 7 – Secret plans, abandoning ship; Reversed: Clumsiness
  • 8 – feeling powerless and stuck; Reversed: Escaping
  • 9 – Overactive mind, anxiety; Reversed: Martyrdom
  • 10 – Feeling defeated, self-sabotage; Reversed: Sabotage

SUIT OF CUPS

suit-of-cups-tarot-cards
  • Other Names: Chalices, Grails, Cauldrons, Hearts, Vessels
  • Element: Water
  • Attributes: Passive, female; cold, wet
  • Astrological Signs: Pisces, Cancer, Scorpio
  • Direction: East
  • Season: Pagan – Autumn- / Esoteric – Summer
  • Self: Emotions, love, receptivity
  • Jungian Function: Feeling
  • Body Part: Heart
  • Qabalistic World: Briah – the Creative World

Water is seen as the emotions, your feelings, and your intuition. Considered passive, water can be deep or shallow; you like the ocean, are responsive to the moon; your tears can rise and fall; out of control, your emotions flood;

Cups represent your emotions, feelings, your subconscious, intuition, and psychism. They deal with love affairs, all relationships, inner expression, your reactions or responses and the pursuit of happiness. Generally passive and not outwardly extrovert, creativity through expression are some of the traits of this suit. Careers are usually in the arts or creative pursuits, they are, poets, painters, florists and designers, nurses, social workers, and caregivers. Cups people are happy in the background doing their own thing, though they are often actors distinguishing the limelight from the private time like no others.

Keywords: creative, intuitive, clairsentient, psychic, passive, affectionate, receptive, imaginative, caring, relationships, love, dreams, sensitivity, romantic, artistic, spiritual, compassionate, tactile, nurturing, the unconscious mind, domesticity, culture, expression, flexibility, fluidity, calm motion, serenity, empathetic, aesthetics and beauty.
Reversed: needy, co-dependent, intense, neglectful, fantasists, uncaring, cold, unfeeling, moody, unresponsive, illogical, lost, negative, pessimistic, emotional, overly sentimental, tearful, selfish.

  • King – Repression of deep feelings, possible alcoholism; Reversed: Selfishness
  • Queen – Emotionally nurturing, intuitive, sensitive; Reversed: Ignorance
  • Knight – Romantic, adventurous, following one’s heart; Reversed: Pessimism
  • Page – Creative, inspired, learning artistic skill; Reversed: Gloomy
  • Ace of Cups – emotional fulfillment, joy; Reversed: Indifferent
  • 2 – Partnership, mutual attraction, compatibility; Reversed: Abandonment
  • 3 – Celebration, fun with friends, laughter; Reversed: Jealousy
  • 4 – Boredom, dissatisfaction with what is being offered; Reversed: Avoidance
  • 5 – Dwelling on the negative, self-pity; Reversed: Alienation
  • 6 – Sentimentality, kindness, help; Reversed: Discouraging
  • 7 – So many choices, indecision, getting lost in fantasy, wishing and dreaming; Reversed: Lethargic
  • 8 – Abandoning something in search of something better, vision; Reversed: Sacrifice
  • 9 – Indulgence, self-satisfaction; Reversed: Disintegration
  • 10 – Emotional bliss, happiness, attainment; Reversed: Disruption

SUIT OF WANDS

suit-of-wands-tarot-cards

  • Other Names: Batons, Staves, Rods, Clubs, Staffs, Scepters
  • Element: Fire
  • Attributes: Active, masculine; hot, dry
  • Astrological Signs: Aries, Leo, Sagittarius
  • Direction: South
  • Season: Pagan – Summer / Esoteric – Spring
  • Self: Will, actions, desire
  • Jungian Function: Intuition
  • Body Part: Genitals
  • Qabalistic World: Atziluth – the Archetypal World

Fire is energy and action, passion, drive, and ambition. An active element, it can cause permanent change; is expansive; can be aggressive; is proactive and undeterred.

Wands represent creativity, energy, passion, and action. They cover your spiritual pursuits, your career, and creative projects. Leadership, self-growth and general optimism are some traits of this suit. Careers are usually in business, they are leaders, entrepreneurial & sales focused. Wands people like to get ahead and are generally proactive in all their activities. With an unrivaled healthy vitality, they are often accomplished sports people.

Keywords: intuition; creativity; vitality; sexuality; spirituality; vision; energetic; outgoing; impulsive; motivational; pro-active; spirit and spirited; optimistic; enterprise; commerce; business; careers; opportunities; the thrill of the chase; competitive; growth; personal development; inspirational; enthusiastic; sexual; passionate; action; movement; initiation.
Reversed: rash; impetuous; ruthless; greedy; narrow-minded; hyperactive; brash; manipulative; conniving; mean-spirited; overly optimistic; risk takers; heartless; aggressive; selfish; misleading; sadistic; distrusting of others.

  • King – Career focused, mature, passionate; Reversed: Impostor
  • Queen – Confidant, focused, has zest for life; Reversed: Fatigue
  • Knight – An adventurous risk taker who follows his passions; Reversed: Apathy
  • Page – newly inspired, excited about life and work; Reversed: Passive
  • Ace of Wands – New beginnings, creative spark, fertile ideas; Reversed: Unpromising
  • 2 – Contemplation, assessing one’s life direction; Reversed: Dispute
  • 3 – Reaping the rewards of your efforts; Reversed: Idleness
  • 4 – Celebration, safety, the home; Reversed: Discord
  • 5 – Competition, minor struggles or disagreements; Reversed: Timidness
  • 6 – Success, accolades, and achievement; Reversed: Disapproval
  • 7 – Feeling defensive and on guard; Reversed: Yielding
  • 8 – Speed, things manifesting quickly; Reversed: Stagnation
  • 9 – Pessimism, gearing up for the worst; Reversed: Weakness
  • 10 – Feeling oppressed, exhaustion, too many responsibilities; Reversed: Impractical

SUIT OF PENTACLES

suit-of-pentacles-tarot-cards

  • Other Names: Disks, Coins, Deniers, Stones, Diamonds
  • Element: Earth
  • Attributes: Passive, female
  • Astrological Signs: Taurus, Virgo, Capricorn
  • Direction: North
  • Season: Pagan – Winter / Esoteric – Winter
  • Self: Body,
  • Jungian Function: Sensation
  • Body Part: Feet
  • Qabalistic World: Assiah

Earth is seen as the material, the physical & the sensual. A Passive element, Earth allows growth & production; promotes prosperity; is the foundation on which anything is built.

Pentacles, represent all things material and physical, what you experience using your senses. They deal with your money, business deals, material possessions, your job, arts, crafts, your home & garden. Working hard & getting the job done are attributes of this suit. Pentacle people don’t mind getting their hands dirty whether that’s working on the land or in a factory. Strong & dependable, often found in the trades, removals, farming, landscaping & homemaking.

Keywords: sensual, sexual; strong; lithe; dependable; reliable; stoic; practical; skilled & skillful; artistic; common sense; traditional; regular; straightforward; grounded; sensible; lush; fertile; growth; luxury; wealth; prosperity; apprenticeships; scholarships; dull; dutiful; realistic; down-to-earth; materialistic; money motivated; domesticity; health & fitness; exercise.
Reversed: miserly; slave drivers; workaholics; pleasure seekers; neglectful; shoddy work; dullards; negative; pessimistic; superstitious; thoughtless; penny pinchers; lazy; unforgiving; selfish; greedy; covetous; moronic.

  • King – Enjoys the good life (food, drink, and leisure), financially secure; Reversed: Hoarder
  • Queen – Healthy in body and finances, grounded and calm; Reversed: Unreasonable
  • Knight – Cautious, sensible and slow to progress; Reversed: Inexperienced
  • Page – Student, commitment to learning; Reversed: Rookie
  • Ace of Pentacles – Financial reward, clarity of life purpose, goals; Reversed: Debt
  • 2 – Balance, multitasking; Reversed: Impractical
  • 3 – Meaningful work, enjoying one’s work, suitable career; Reversed: Mediocrity
  • 4 – Hoarding, feeling poor, holding self-back out of fear; Reversed: Greed
  • 5 – Minor money troubles, health problems, feeling like an outsider; Reversed: Helplessness
  • 6 – Charity, accepting and giving help; Reversed: Cruelty
  • 7 – Patience, waiting for your plans to bear fruit; Reversed: Unemployment
  • 8 – Hard work, focused efforts, laying the groundwork; Reversed: Skill-shortage
  • 9 – Luxury, rest, financial and material comforts; Reversed: Dependency
  • 10 – Financial success, strong business relationships; Reversed: Restrictions